[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /viewtopic.php on line 988: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'Europe/Moscow' for 'MSD/4.0/DST' instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /viewtopic.php on line 988: getdate(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'Europe/Moscow' for 'MSD/4.0/DST' instead
SolaraGuy.com • View topic - Looking into Aftermarket Wheels? READ THIS!!
Talk about aftermarket Toyota Solara Gen 1-1.5 upgrades.

Looking into Aftermarket Wheels? READ THIS!!

Looking into Aftermarket Wheels? READ THIS!!

Postby hari-bhari » Tue Nov 28, 2006 8:21 pm

I have been searching for wheels for the past several months and through this process accumulated a good bit of knowledge from various threads on this site as well as other sources. So I thought we could make a single thread with a summary on everything regarding aftermarket wheels and tires that pertains to Solaras, and if its deemed worthy, just make it a sticky in this section, so doofuses like me don't go hunting around and posting 1324534 threads.

When equipping your car with aftermarket wheels, there are many things to look at:

Wheel Diameter:
This is the size of the wheel, such as 18". Bigger wheels are usually heavier and thus will make your car slower. If you get a bigger wheel than stock, you must get lower profile tires. More on that later.

Wheel Width:
This is the width of the rim, such as 7.5" or 8", as if you were looking at it from the back of the car. Wider wheels require wider tires and various offset adjustments. More on this later.

Bolt Pattern:
The bolt pattern of the wheel is key in determining whether or not it will fit on your car. Toyotas have a bolt pattern of 5x114.3 which means there are five lugs with spacings of 114.3mm. Some cars have 5x100, others have 4x100, etc. The point is, you have to get a wheel that matches the bolt pattern on our cars, which is 5x114.3 (sometimes listed as just 5x114). If the bolt patterns do not match, the wheel will NOT go on your car. I have seem some bolt pattern adapters, but I don't know how safe or strong they are.

Hub Size:
The hub size is basically the diameter of your hub in mm. Solaras have a hub size of 60.1mm. This is important when choosing spacers or hub centric rings. More on that later.

Center Bore or Hub Bore (on wheel):
Every wheel in the back has something called the hub bore or center bore. This is the space in the back of the wheel where you hub inserts. It is where your wheel 'sits' on your hub. Therefore, as you can imagine, it is important that the size of the hub bore on the wheel and the size of the hub on your car match up, else your wheel will wobble. f the hub bore on the wheel is too small, you are generally SOL unless you want to pay a lot of money to get the wheels bored out larger, but I don't know how safe this is. But if the hub bore on the wheel is too big, then there is an option: hub centric rings. More on this later.

Offset:
The next thing to look at after the size, is the offset. The offset determines how far off the hub the wheel sits on your car. A lower offset means the wheel sits further away from the hub, causing it to stick outwards more from the body. A higher offset moves the wheel in towards the body more. Offset is measured in mm, and you may think a few mm here and there don't matter but they do. Move the wheel too far out and you'll rub the fender, too far in will rub the strut. As far as an lowered Gen1-1.5 Solara goes:

-18x7.5 - 45 offset
-18x8 width - 42 offset
-Someone post other values they know of and I'll fill them in

The offset can be lowered more, to around 35mm, for a more agressive look, however you will have to get your fenders rolled so the wheels don't rub. Also keep in mind, each wheel and tire is slightly different, so your offset may vary but not by more than 1-2mm. In general it is better to have a offset too low (rub the fender, which can then be rolled), than a offset that is too high causing the wheel to rub the strut.

Spacers:
Oftentimes, when you buy a wheel, they dont have the correct offset. If the offset is too low, lets say around 35, then I think the only option you have is to roll your fenders. However, if the offset is too high , spacers can be used to bring the wheel out further from the hub, i.e. decrease the offset. Spacers usually come in increments of mm, but sometimes inches. So if you have a 50mm offset wheel, and you employ a 8mm spacer, you will decrease your offset to 42mm, thus enabling you to use a wheel that would otherwise rub your strut. It is important however, when buying a spacer, to buy a spacer that fits the hub of your wheel. Genreally, if the spacer is made for Toyotas it will be fine. Otherwise, try and look for the diameter and get one that matches the Toyota hub diameter of 60.1mm

Hub Centric Rings:
The job of a hub centric ring is to close the gap between your wheel and your hub. For example, madza wheels have a center bore of 67mm (which is the hub size on most mazdas). Toyotas, as stated earlier, have a hub size of only 60.1. That means, when you sit a mazda wheel on toyota, there will be a 6.9mm gap between the wheel and the hub on your car. So what you do is get a hub centric ring that has an inner diameter equal to the size of your car (60.1mm) and an outer diameter equal to the size of the hub bore on the wheel (67mm in this case). This will close the open gap between the wheel and the hub, thus eliminating an wobble at high speeds.

Tire Sizes: There are three important measurements on the size of a tire, the width of the tire, the height of the sidewall, and the diameter of the wheel. For example, the most common size here is 225/40/18 for 18 inch wheels. This means the width of the tire is 225mm, the height of the sidewall is 40mm, and the diameter of the wheel opening is 18". If you increase the width, lets say to 235mm, you will have to run a different offset to prevent rubbing. If you increase the height of the sidewall, you will get more cushioning, but you might rub your fenders. If you decrease, you may get a more jarring ride. The last number can't really be played with, it has to match the size of your wheel.

I hope this guide comes in handy for everyone. Please feel free to leave comments or suggestions and I will incorporate them. And for those of you rolling your eyes and going 'Duh, I already knew all that,' please keep in mind that even you had to learn from somewhere.
Last edited by hari-bhari on Wed Nov 29, 2006 1:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
hari-bhari
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
 
Posts: 2148
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2003 6:38 pm

Postby bassthrive » Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:12 pm

sticky!
- Paul

y2k(1MZ)dWp
cpe mafci / apexi ws / tein s-tech + tokico / trd rsb
bassthrive
SolaraGuy Marklar
SolaraGuy Marklar
 
Posts: 1778
Joined: Sun Jun 02, 2002 8:39 pm
Location: Orlando, FL

Postby that1mexguy » Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:22 pm

Sure, make it a sticky under Tutorials. Good job man, so are you still looking for wheels?
that1mexguy
SolaraGuy Supporter
SolaraGuy Supporter
 
Posts: 2454
Joined: Fri Nov 01, 2002 4:44 pm
Location: Atl, GA

Postby hari-bhari » Tue Nov 28, 2006 11:33 pm

Yup man, still lookin :roll:

debating b/w 18 and 19 now.

as for this thread, put it as a sticky in aftermarket upgrades if anything, not tutorials. tutorials are for DIY jobs, this is how to make an informed purchase.
hari-bhari
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
 
Posts: 2148
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2003 6:38 pm

Postby RDKamikaze » Tue Nov 28, 2006 11:51 pm

Sticky please! Really informative to people like me! I never knew spacers took away offset. 50 + 8 = 42, cool!
Image
User avatar
RDKamikaze
SolaraGuy Driver
SolaraGuy Driver
 
Posts: 933
Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 5:59 pm
Location: Mesa, AZ

Postby krook » Wed Nov 29, 2006 1:20 pm

Offset:
The next thing to look at after the size, is the offset. The offset determines how far off the hub the wheel sits on your car. A lower offset means the wheel sits further away from the hub, causing it to stick outwards more from the body. A lower offset moves the wheel in towards the body more. Offset is measured in mm, and you may think a few mm here and there don't matter but they do. Move the wheel too far out and you'll rub the fender, too far in will rub the strut. As far as an lowered Gen1-1.5 Solara goes

you may want to edit this part, as it's confusing. i think you mean to say:'
"Lower offset seats further away; Higher offset seats closer to body"
krook
SolaraGuy Supporter
SolaraGuy Supporter
 
Posts: 2675
Joined: Mon Aug 05, 2002 3:18 pm
Location: Hawaii

Postby hari-bhari » Wed Nov 29, 2006 1:54 pm

yup you're right. i fixed it. thanks!
hari-bhari
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
 
Posts: 2148
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2003 6:38 pm

Re: Looking into Aftermarket Wheels? READ THIS!!

Postby Jai_Jai_Binks » Thu Nov 30, 2006 2:53 pm

hari-bhari wrote:Bolt Pattern:
The bolt pattern of the wheel is key in determining whether or not it will fit on your car. Toyotas have a bolt pattern of 5x114.3 which means there are five lugs with spacings of 114.3mm. Some cars have 5x100, others have 4x100, etc. The point is, you have to get a wheel that matches the bolt pattern on our cars, which is 5x114.3 (sometimes listed as just 5x114). If the bolt patterns do not match, the wheel will NOT go on your car. I have seem some bolt pattern adapters, but I don't know how safe or strong they are.


FYI Intresting points to note:
Not all toyota's have a bolt pattern on 5x114.3. 5 lug celica's and mr2's and mr-s's have a bolt pattern of 5*100. Gen 2 camry's have a bolt patten on also 5*114.3.

This summer i was selling my oem rims to a toyota truck dude. His bolt patten was also 5*114.3. The wheel on measurement were perfect (infact many people at tn suggest most 114.3 wheels fit 5 lug trucks). However the situation was that his wheelbering (sp??) - the little bubble in the middle was too wide for our oem wheels. just wanted point out other intresting facts not prelisted above.
User avatar
Jai_Jai_Binks
Desi SolaraGuy
Desi SolaraGuy
 
Posts: 5751
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2002 11:59 am
Location: Friendswood, TX

Postby hari-bhari » Thu Nov 30, 2006 2:55 pm

excellent point. thank you.

no love from the mods, huh? i guess if someone wants this info later they'll just have to dig it up
hari-bhari
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
 
Posts: 2148
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2003 6:38 pm

Postby Toy1mzfe » Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:01 pm

For example, the most common size here is 225/40/18 for 18 inch wheels. This means the width of the tire is 225mm, the height of the sidewall is 40mm, and the diameter of the wheel opening is 18"



40 actually describes the aspect ratio of the tire - in other words, how "thick" or "thin" the tire is relative to the section width. In this example, the tire would have a "thickness" of 40% of its width, or 90 millimeters.

soo... 40% of 225mm is 90mm

just a heads up.
Image
User avatar
Toy1mzfe
SolaraGuy Street Racer
SolaraGuy Street Racer
 
Posts: 1400
Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 2:04 am
Location: San Francisco (415)

Postby funboy102 » Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:11 pm

Toy1mzfe wrote:
For example, the most common size here is 225/40/18 for 18 inch wheels. This means the width of the tire is 225mm, the height of the sidewall is 40mm, and the diameter of the wheel opening is 18"



40 actually describes the aspect ratio of the tire - in other words, how "thick" or "thin" the tire is relative to the section width. In this example, the tire would have a "thickness" of 40% of its width, or 90 millimeters.

soo... 40% of 225mm is 90mm

just a heads up.


Man... you beat me to it, was just bout to say it.

But he's right... the middle number is an aspect ratio, a percentage per se, but not a definite number. Make sure you change it... and then maybe it'll be a sticky :D
Image
1999 Solara SE V6 5-Speed PICS! http://www.solaraguy.com/viewtopic.php?t=43759
User avatar
funboy102
SolaraGuy Street Racer
SolaraGuy Street Racer
 
Posts: 1051
Joined: Mon Jun 19, 2006 7:32 pm
Location: Pensacola, FL

Postby Hsakuragi » Tue Mar 20, 2007 11:01 pm

hari-bhari wrote:excellent point. thank you.

no love from the mods, huh? i guess if someone wants this info later they'll just have to dig it up



lol..it appeared!
The ONE & ONLY Fully Loaded 2006 X Avalon Limited with Body Kit in CA = Special Limited Edition + First 2GR-FE rebored the throttle body (i think...)

Image
Hsakuragi
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
SolaraGuy Semi-Pro Racer
 
Posts: 3511
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2002 10:50 pm
Location: Bay Area, CA

Postby Toy1mzfe » Tue Mar 20, 2007 11:39 pm

MOD: PLease sticky this.!!! foreal though. there shoudl be a section for, it would so make searchin easier:

Wheels/brakes/suspension

forced induction

engine tranny

exterior/ice

DIY
Image
User avatar
Toy1mzfe
SolaraGuy Street Racer
SolaraGuy Street Racer
 
Posts: 1400
Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 2:04 am
Location: San Francisco (415)

Postby PXLpainter » Tue Mar 20, 2007 11:53 pm

***chews wad of gum... spits it out and puts it on the back of this thread***

Okay - now it's Sticky! ;)
Old CarDomain pages here: http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2247283
So-long to my 2006 SLE Convertible...
Image
User avatar
PXLpainter
Mod Alumni
Mod Alumni
 
Posts: 6442
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2006 8:31 pm
Location: Ojai, CA

Tire sizes

Postby PDX SuperSolara » Tue May 15, 2007 11:36 am

Toy1MZFE was on the right track so to speak regarding tire aspect ratio. The 40 in this example is not the thickness however, but the height of the sidewall or "tallness" as compared to the tread width. Or in this case as he said 40%. In this case 40% of 225mm is 90mm. A 225 45 17 tire would therefore have a sidewall of 101.25mm. Since the wheel the later tire fits on is smaller in diameter, the extra sidewall height makes each tire and wheel setup about the same diameter, though the 18 inch setup is slightly bigger in diameter and thus slower to accellerate due to the increased final drive ratio.

A couple more points, the width is a measurement not of the tread width but the overall width of the tire, some sidewalls "bulge out" more and some are straighter or flatter between wheel and tread. The straighter sidewall tire of the same "size" would then have a wider tread than a bulgy sidewall tire but be number designation would be the same. Also, tire sizes are a general rule, but they vary a lot from manufacturer to manufacturer. One company's 225 may be a bit wider or narrower than another. So to be exact, they are only good for comparing generally within a particular company's offerings. I have seen a 225 width that was only 220 when measured, and from another company a 215 that was 220 when measured, so the widths were the same but the sizes different! Many companies, such as Pirelli, will give sizes and exact dimentions on data sheets.

As for the best street tire size for accelleration, a magazine a few years ago took the same wheel and tire in several different sizes and compared which was the fastest. They had 16, 17, 18, 19. The 17 were the fastest because they were the least weight towards the outside if the setup, which made the wheel itself easier to spin, and was not an increase in overall diameter. The tire and wheel combos were all made as close in diameter as the original 16 inch wheel and tire, the 17 was a tiny bit shorter, the 18 and 19 even with very low profile tire were a bit taller. The original 16 was second, then 18 and 19 was last. The added wheel weight really hurt the bigger setups especially as it was added to the outside. They were 225-50-16, 225-45-17, 225-40-18, and 225-35-19 I think.
Jim @ Foreign Affairs
2315 SE 11th Avenue
Portland, Oregon 97214
503-236-2871
PDX SuperSolara
Regular SolaraGuy Member
Regular SolaraGuy Member
 
Posts: 112
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2005 2:10 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Next

Return to Aftermarket Gen1 and 1.5

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests